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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods found in the catalog.

Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods

Richard H. Jahns

Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods

by Richard H. Jahns

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Published by United States Government Printing Office in Washington .
Written in English


Edition Notes

At head of title: United States Department of the Interior. Geological Survey.

Statementprepared in cooperation withthe Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Works.
SeriesGeological Survey water-supply paper -- 996
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20283324M

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK Massachusetts is formed of a Precambrian basement that has a thin veneer of Paleozoic strata west of the Connecticut River valley, local fault basins of Eocambrian to Jurassic strata elsewhere, and an offshore apron of Cretaceous and Tertiary deposits, all typically masked by a thin mantle of glacial.   Geology-Upper Valley-Connecticut River Our aim is to tell the story of the relatively recent Earth history. By recent we mean the last millions years or so. Alas, the first four billion years of Earth history is poorly represented in this area, but some pre-Cambrian rocks can be seen in the core of the Green Mountains and the.

Cape Cod, a sandy peninsula built mostly during the Ice Age, juts into the Atlantic Ocean like a crooked arm. Because of its exposed location, Cape Cod was visited by many early explorers. Although clear-cut evidence is lacking, the Vikings may have sighted this land about 1, years ago. It was visited by Samuel de Champlain in , and his detailed descriptions and charts . The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States, flowing roughly southward for miles ( km) through four rises at the U.S. border with Quebec, Canada, and discharges at Long Island Sound. Its watershed encompasses five U.S. states and one Canadian province, 11, square miles (29, km 2) via tributaries, 38 Mouth: Long Island Sound.

  Following the “Great Migration” population grew and demand for land pushed settlers west and south., the settlers and their offspring spread out – first to the Connecticut Coast (see Native American Life in Massachusetts After European Contact – Pequot War) and then up the Connecticut River Valley. The settlement of the Connecticut River Valley is interesting . A sinkhole is a depression in the ground that has no natural external surface drainage. Basically, this means that when it rains, all of the water stays inside the sinkhole and typically drains into the subsurface. Sinkholes are most common in what geologists call, “karst terrain.” These are regions where the types of rock below the land.


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Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods by Richard H. Jahns Download PDF EPUB FB2

Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts, as related to recent floods,U.S. Geological Survey, Water-Supply Paper, W [R. Jahns] on. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Jahns, Richard H.

(Richard Henry), Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods. This report gives the results of a geologic study of certain features that bear upon the recent flood behavior of rivers flowing in the Massachusetts part of the Connecticut Valley.

It is in part an outline of the physiographic history of the Connecticut River, a 'history that Massachusetts as related to recent floods book treated in progressively greater detail as it concerns events occurring from Mesozoic time to the present. Get this from a library. Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods.

[Richard H Jahns; Geological Survey (U.S.),; Massachusetts. Department of. Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts as related to recent floods by Richard H. Jahns,United States Government Printing Office edition, in English.

Glaciers, Bays of Massachusetts, and Cape Cod. The most recent geological event to shape New England came as part of the Wisconsin Ice Age. Aro years ago. Connecticut River Valley. The Dynamic Digital Map of New England by Chris Condit (U-Mass, Amherst) This program presents four thematic maps of Massachusetts, in five overlapping segments, including the State Geologic Map.

this book is a great resource for the geologic layperson interested in the geologist history of the Connecticut Valley. A Brief Geological History of the Connecticut River Valley By Prof.

Richard D. Little [Please see the 3 rd edition of Dinosaurs, Dunes, and Drifting Continents and/or the DVDs Flow of Time and Rise and Fall of Lake Hitchcock for more in-depth content. They are available at your local library or order from “publications” on the home page of this web site.].

(Zen et al., ) Thescale Bedrock Geologic Map of Massachusetts, published by the USGS inshows the distribution of the different rock units, faults, and other features that Simplified Bedrock Geologic Map of Massachusetts.

The purpose of this little book is to present, in popular form, the salient points in the geological history of the Connecticut Valley of Massachusetts. The beautiful valley and its charming boundary hills may in truth be said to be a geologist's : William John Miller. River Valley.

This soft surface has since been downcut, resedimented and oft flooded by the Connecticut River, making it a very soft, nutrient-replenished area and host to the majority of Connecticut's farmland soils. The land on either side of the Connecticut River Valley is less suitable for farmlands.

The geology of Massachusetts includes numerous units of volcanic, intrusive igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks formed within the last billion years. The oldest formations are gneiss rocks in the Berkshires, which were metamorphosed from older rocks during the Proterozoic Grenville orogeny as the proto-North American continent Laurentia collided.

The amount of water corresponding to a year flood, a year flood, or a 1,year flood is known as a "flood quantile". For instance, on a given river, the flood quantile corresponding to the year flood might be 10, cubic feet per second (cfs) and the flood quantile corresponding to the year flood might be 15, cfs.

The. v. History of the Connecticut Valley in Massachusetts. History of Hampshire Countyv. History of Franklin County. History of Hampden County. Title: History of the Connecticut Valley in Massachusetts: History of Franklin County.

History of Hampden County Volume 2 of History of the Connecticut Valley in Massachusetts: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers, L.H. Everts &. Connecticut Valley Region, West-Central Massachusetts Compiled by Janet R.

Stone and Mary L. DiGiacomo-Cohen Introduction The surficial geologic map layer shows the distribution of nonlithified earth materials at land surface in an area of 24 minute quadrangles (1, mi2 total) in west-central Massachusetts (fig. 1).File Size: KB. Abstract. A Frequently quoted definition of a flood plain is that of Rice (, p.

): ‘a strip of relatively smooth land bordering a stream [and] overflowed in times of high water’. Valley flats which would usually be considered flood plains, on this definition, include features formed by such processes as landslides and the building of low-angle fans.

Explanatory Text (19 pages, x11 inches) [KB PDF]. Introduction. The surficial geologic map layer shows the distribution of nonlithified earth materials at land surface in an area of 24 minute quadrangles (1, mi 2 total) in west-central Massachusetts. Across Massachusetts, these materials range from a few feet to more than ft in thickness.

Connecticut Geology: How the Past Shapes the Present Introduction Connecticut Geology: How the Past Shapes the Present is a unit covering Earth science concepts as they relate to the geology of Connecticut. The impetus for creating this unit came about as part of the re-design of the Hall of Minerals,File Size: 1MB.

WSP / Jahns, R. / GEOLOGIC FEATURES OF THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY, MASSACHUSETTS, AS RELATED TO RECENT FLOODS,pb, pages, 33 plates, (20 in pocket), 4 figs., 23 tables, $ 58 Continue to next page of Water Supply Papers beginning with # End of WSP Catalog.

Click on any link to continue. Journal of Hydrology ELSEVIER Journal of Hydrology () Hydroclimatological and geomorphic controls on the timing and spatial variability of floods in New England, USA Francis J.

Magilligana'*, Brian E. Graberb aDartmouth College, Department of Geography, Fairchild, Hanover, NilUSA bDepartment of Geography, University of Wisconsin, Cited by: Flood geology (also creation geology or diluvial geology) is the attempt to interpret and reconcile geological features of the Earth in accordance with a literal belief in the global flood described in Genesis 6– the early 19th century, diluvial geologists hypothesized that specific surface features were evidence of a worldwide flood which had followed earlier geological eras; after.

The “upstream” approach to flood hazard evaluation involves the estimation of hydrologic response in small drainage basins. This study demonstrates the application of geomorphology to such studies in a region of unusually intense flooding in central Texas.

One approach to flood hazard evaluation in this area is a parametric model relating flood Cited by: